How Hvac Tech Is Helping To Combat Covid-19 Risks

Most of us spend the majority of our time in air-conditioned or heated spaces, whether it’s at home, at work, or at school. As we monitor the latest COVID-19 information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other experts, we’ve learned that ventilated air, particularly in spaces like offices and classrooms, may be able to transmit the virus. As people begin returning to work and to school, commercial HVAC companies are now under pressure to adapt their technology to make the air safer for everyone. 

The leading experts are still studying the role HVAC systems play in transmitting COVID-19, and while HVAC systems may not be wholly responsible for transmission, the experts have cautioned against groups of people gathering in ventilated places. But with many workplaces starting to re-open and students heading back to the classroom, commercial building owners find themselves responsible for providing as safe an environment as possible using the latest HVAC technology. 

How can HVAC systems make the air safer?

To start, rest assured that it’s not necessary to install an entirely new ventilation system. This would be expensive, time-consuming, and impractical all around. Instead, we can look to commercial buildings like hospitals and other healthcare facilities that already have very high standards regarding air hygiene. Due to the fact that many vulnerable and immunocompromised people stay in or visit these facilities on a daily basis, it’s essential that the air be as clean as possible. 

The HVAC systems in hospitals and other medical facilities are designed to minimize airborne infections like COVID-19, and these HVAC systems use four methods to stop the spread of infectious air particles: disinfection, pressurization, dilution, and filtration. Unfortunately, some of these methods are limited to hospitals and can be costly to implement. 

Because it’s not feasible to integrate all of these methods into existing commercial HVAC systems, we recommend focusing on disinfection because certain disinfection methods can be easily incorporated into your existing HVAC system. Hospitals and other medical facilities use special ultraviolet devices in their ventilation ducts to kill all microorganisms that live in the air, and there is evidence to suggest that ultraviolet light kills COVID-19

These ultraviolet light systems can be installed in your ventilation ducts in the ceiling, and they’re some of the most commonly-used systems for air hygiene and safety in places like airports and hospitals. But as offices, factories, and classrooms open up again, we predict we’ll see an increase in building managers who are interested in installing ultraviolet systems in their spaces. 

Ask your commercial HVAC contractor 

For commercial building owners, the health and safety of everyone on the property is the number one priority. If you’re concerned about air hygiene or want to know what’s possible with your current ventilation system, we recommend contacting your trusted HVAC commercial contractor who can recommend ways to sanitize your building’s air. HVAC companies are still learning about the role ventilation plays in COVID-19 transmission, and as they work to adapt their technologies to the latest information, we hope to see more efficient and readily-available methods of air purification in the near future. 

For more information about how we are adapting commercial ventilation systems to kill any microorganisms including COVID-19 and provide safer ventilation, or if you have any questions, please contact Tri-Tech Energy today. Discover why so many people in New Jersey choose us as their trusted commercial HVAC contractor. Our team is standing by and we look forward to hearing from you. 

Original content is posted on https://www.tritechenergy.com/blog/hvac-tech-helping-combat-covid-19-risks/

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